“Candy Corn” Recipe – Going Back to Its Roots

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I was recently confronted with a cornucopia of candy corn, and lived to tell the tale. In one of my most amusing assignments to date, I got to learn all about candy corn, including how people *really* feel about it. It doesn’t take long to scratch the surface – people are happy to share their oddly passionate views about the little waxy sugar bombs that many will say are neither proper candy – and certainly not – proper corn.

Neither good 'candy' nor good 'corn' - What's in candy corn, anyway? Click To Tweet

If you want to check out my tale of candy corn before the big day (Halloween, that is), mosey on over here to read up on what’s in candy corn, anyway.

If you want to check out my take on putting the “corn” back into this whimsical Halloween sweet, stay with me. I’m not a big sweets person*, so my version is actually a savory dish, and full of veggies. Decidedly not candy. But it has all the fun poppy colors of candy corn. And I think it tastes way better. I suppose the five-dollar plastic skeletons party is an option either way.

Actual corn in faux 'candy corn' made with REAL #veggies! #recipe #minddietmeals Click To Tweet

MIND diet foods: vegetables, olive oil, poultry

Ingredients:

a spooky candy corn scene

2 white potatoes, thin skin, large diced
1 small head of garlic
1/2 cup of milk, warmed
1 T olive oil
3 medium carrots, peeled, then chopped or spiralized
1 lb extra lean ground turkey (I used Jennie-O), you will have extra
1-2 ears yellow corn, kernels cut off

Optional: Halloween decor, either sanitized (or commit to not eating anything that touches it)

Optional: You could sub crumbled sauteed tofu for the turkey to make this vegetarian

 

Directions:

Each component can be made a day ahead of time, and kids (or adults) can help assemble their own.

Mashed Potatoes

  1. In a medium pot, bring water to a boil with a large pinch of salt
  2. Add potatoes and boil 15 minutes until tender, but not over-cooked
  3. Drain
  4. Add potatoes back to pot, add oil and slowly incorporate milk while mashing to desired consistency (you may not need all the milk)
  5. Mix in roasted garlic

Roasted Garlic

  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Chop off top 1/4, place in generous amount of tin foil, drizzle with olive oil, salt and white pepper, ensuring it gets coated, and close off top of tin foil into ball
  3. Bake for 30 minutes or so, which should make it soft but not brown (this is simply to protect the ‘candy corn’ color scheme), knife should slide in to flesh easily
  4. Let it cool; and when its cool enough to handle, squeeze from bottom so cloves pop out
  5. Mash before adding to mashed potatoes

Turkey

  1. Heat 1 teaspoon of olive oil in a saute pan over medium heat until hot
  2. Add turkey and season to taste
  3. Cook until done, breaking up pieces with spatula, about 7 minutes or until browned through

Carrots

  1. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil and then turn the heat off
  2. Prepare an ice bath
  3. Blanche carrots in water briefly until just wilted, then dunk in ice bath before removing and setting aside to dry
  4. Optional: rough chop into 2-3″ pieces to make them easier to eat

Assembly

  1. Assembly can be done in any cup or bowl, but it’s festive if you can use clear martini glasses
  2. Add potatoes as a bottom layer as the candy corn “tip.” Optional (and recommended): Put the potatoes in a plastic sandwich bag and cut a corner to make an impromptu pastry bag and then pipe it in, filling the cup 1/4 of way
  3. At this point, use a small glass or a shot glass, wrapped in parchment paper, and gently place on top of potatoes
  4. Position carrots around glass for 2 quarters of the way; pack carrots in
  5. Add corn on top for the last 1/4
  6. Carefully remove shot glass, leaving parchment paper, and fill center with turkey mix
  7. Carefully slip parchment paper out
  8. Cover turkey with a little more corn if desired (optional)
  9. Dig in!

Tip: It’s more than fine to turn your creation upside-down onto a plate for eating if that’s easier!

*I do have a soft spot for dainty French macarons. I’m partial to pistachio, earl grey, and rose macarons.

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